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The “everything-as-a-service” era: Content and business processes

The “everything-as-a-service” era: Content and business processes

4 minute read

The “everything-as-a-service” era: Content and business processes

4 minute read

The “everything-as-a-service” era: Content and business processes

Paige Toomes

Copywriter and Digital Marketer

Cloud technology, and particularly Software as a Service (SaaS) is being adopted more and more in our home and work lives.

According to Forbes, 83% of enterprise workloads were predicted to be in the cloud by 2020.

This article will discuss content and business processes ‘as a service’ — that is, ‘CaaS’ and ‘BPaaS’ which are relatively new concepts.

I’ll talk about what these terms mean for organisations, and how they can improve operations using CaaS and BPaaS.

Unpacking ‘as a service’

"A service is something that I use but do not own,” explains Mat Hunter, Chief Design Officer at the Design Council.

And the term 'as a service' is always used in the context of cloud computing. Today, with all of the technology available, we tend to own less things, and have started to use services more online.

People today like 'everything as a service' because of:

  • Reduced infrastructure costs
  • Accessible on multiple devices
  • The vast choice of applications available
  • Constant stream of emerging innovative services
  • Free, or affordable pay-as-you-go or subscription model
  • Connectivity and instant comms
  • Scalable and flexible
  • Highly customisable
  • Centralised storage
  • Use of automation and AI
  • Integrations
  • User-focused design
  • Mobile-friendly
  • Quick and easy

The list goes on. But, the line between products and services has also blurred in the cloud. Take the evolution of music for example:

→ Used to be a product in the form of records, tapes and CD

→ Became digitised with Mp3 and iTunes

→ Now Spotify which is a subscription-based SaaS

Or what about something like Microsoft Word?

When I was at university, I bought the product version of Microsoft Office for Students, but when I graduated and got a Macbook, I was told I couldn’t just install the same one. I had to buy a new version for Mac. I was frustrated about this and thought no way am I doing that. They do have an Outlook browser version, but I think we can all agree - it's not as good.

These days I hardly use Word anymore, I use GatherContent instead. And it’s a breath of fresh air if I’m honest. Content creation tools have moved on.

Content as a Service (CaaS)

For content creation and management, the fragmentation of audiences, rise of content marketing, and the sheer number of web properties the average enterprise have to oversee means that it is becoming increasingly complex.

Content as a service solves this problem. It includes content management systems (CMS) such as Wordpress or Drupal, however, these aren’t always good environments for creating, editing and communicating around content.

CaaS is a fresh approach to creating and managing content, replacing multiple project management tools and instead using a single, enterprise-wide platform, which also considers the pre-CMS stage of content creation and editing.

Generally, CaaS is about aligning technology with content strategy. It’s thinking about the whole of your content operations and unifying people, tools and processes in the cloud to create better, user-centered content for your audiences.

Here’s what CaaS looks like in an organisation:

  • Decoupled/headless CMS. This approach means separating content creation, management, and storage of content from the presentation. Once content is created and edited in the back-end, you can deliver the raw content to any front-end design on any device or channel. This simplifies the CMS architecture and makes content delivery scalable, fast and flexible for multiple channels and devices.

  • Metadata, architecture and content models. With CaaS, information architecture, and metadata such as categories and tags in content and are all important components. And it is an approach to content with clear, well-defined content models.

  • REST-based API. Content that is provided with a REST API is flexible. It means you can pull content from your projects and into whatever platform or CMS you are using.

  • Structured content. Structured content is a key part of CaaS. That is, using templates and chunking to ensure it is in the correct format and style for multiple channels, improving the consistency, flexibility, reuse and repurpose of content.

  • Reduced silos. CaaS uses a centralised place for all content, which enables teams, departments and systems to connect better across organisations on a single platform.

Business Process as a service

Business Process as a service (BPaaS) is a bit broader than CaaS, as it encompasses a lot more under the same term. It is defined by Gartner as:

“The delivery of business process outsourcing (BPO) services that are sourced from the cloud and constructed for multitenancy. Services are often automated, and where human process actors are required, there is no overtly dedicated labor pool per client. ”

Email can be classed as BPaaS, although we’ve moved on now to more advanced tools that can handle any business process, whether that’s in sales, marketing, finance, HR and the list goes on.

BPaaS ultimately can provide more productivity, reduced costs, simplified processes, and higher-quality output. Here are some characteristics:

  • Standardised for use across industries and organisations.  This means it’s flexible and repeatable, meaning higher efficiency and, ultimately, better service and experience for customers.

  • Configurable workflows. Creating workflows for all kinds of business operations with roles and responsibilities, which helps keep people on track, keep projects on time and in-budget, and avoid duplicate work and bottlenecks.

  • Planning tools. Calendars, scheduling, and visibility of where a project is up to, deadlines and milestones.  

  • Collaboration. Assign tasks and responsibilities, version control, communication around projects easily, with in-line commenting and automated notifications.

GatherContent combines both, working in harmony with your CMS

GatherContent is a SaaS Content Operations Platform that fits into both the CaaS and BPaaS categories. It helps organisations plan, create and manage high-stakes content at scale. Improve your content productivity and quality through clear workflow and task assignments, and communicate about content in one centralised place.

With flexible integrations and API, GatherContent sits well with your other tools, and you can create structured content ready to map to your CMS. No more copy and pasting — hurrah! Use it to handle day-to-day content operations as well as things like large website launches, redesigns or other big content projects.

To find out more, book a free demo or product tour.

Cloud technology, and particularly Software as a Service (SaaS) is being adopted more and more in our home and work lives.

According to Forbes, 83% of enterprise workloads were predicted to be in the cloud by 2020.

This article will discuss content and business processes ‘as a service’ — that is, ‘CaaS’ and ‘BPaaS’ which are relatively new concepts.

I’ll talk about what these terms mean for organisations, and how they can improve operations using CaaS and BPaaS.

Unpacking ‘as a service’

"A service is something that I use but do not own,” explains Mat Hunter, Chief Design Officer at the Design Council.

And the term 'as a service' is always used in the context of cloud computing. Today, with all of the technology available, we tend to own less things, and have started to use services more online.

People today like 'everything as a service' because of:

  • Reduced infrastructure costs
  • Accessible on multiple devices
  • The vast choice of applications available
  • Constant stream of emerging innovative services
  • Free, or affordable pay-as-you-go or subscription model
  • Connectivity and instant comms
  • Scalable and flexible
  • Highly customisable
  • Centralised storage
  • Use of automation and AI
  • Integrations
  • User-focused design
  • Mobile-friendly
  • Quick and easy

The list goes on. But, the line between products and services has also blurred in the cloud. Take the evolution of music for example:

→ Used to be a product in the form of records, tapes and CD

→ Became digitised with Mp3 and iTunes

→ Now Spotify which is a subscription-based SaaS

Or what about something like Microsoft Word?

When I was at university, I bought the product version of Microsoft Office for Students, but when I graduated and got a Macbook, I was told I couldn’t just install the same one. I had to buy a new version for Mac. I was frustrated about this and thought no way am I doing that. They do have an Outlook browser version, but I think we can all agree - it's not as good.

These days I hardly use Word anymore, I use GatherContent instead. And it’s a breath of fresh air if I’m honest. Content creation tools have moved on.

Content as a Service (CaaS)

For content creation and management, the fragmentation of audiences, rise of content marketing, and the sheer number of web properties the average enterprise have to oversee means that it is becoming increasingly complex.

Content as a service solves this problem. It includes content management systems (CMS) such as Wordpress or Drupal, however, these aren’t always good environments for creating, editing and communicating around content.

CaaS is a fresh approach to creating and managing content, replacing multiple project management tools and instead using a single, enterprise-wide platform, which also considers the pre-CMS stage of content creation and editing.

Generally, CaaS is about aligning technology with content strategy. It’s thinking about the whole of your content operations and unifying people, tools and processes in the cloud to create better, user-centered content for your audiences.

Here’s what CaaS looks like in an organisation:

  • Decoupled/headless CMS. This approach means separating content creation, management, and storage of content from the presentation. Once content is created and edited in the back-end, you can deliver the raw content to any front-end design on any device or channel. This simplifies the CMS architecture and makes content delivery scalable, fast and flexible for multiple channels and devices.

  • Metadata, architecture and content models. With CaaS, information architecture, and metadata such as categories and tags in content and are all important components. And it is an approach to content with clear, well-defined content models.

  • REST-based API. Content that is provided with a REST API is flexible. It means you can pull content from your projects and into whatever platform or CMS you are using.

  • Structured content. Structured content is a key part of CaaS. That is, using templates and chunking to ensure it is in the correct format and style for multiple channels, improving the consistency, flexibility, reuse and repurpose of content.

  • Reduced silos. CaaS uses a centralised place for all content, which enables teams, departments and systems to connect better across organisations on a single platform.

Business Process as a service

Business Process as a service (BPaaS) is a bit broader than CaaS, as it encompasses a lot more under the same term. It is defined by Gartner as:

“The delivery of business process outsourcing (BPO) services that are sourced from the cloud and constructed for multitenancy. Services are often automated, and where human process actors are required, there is no overtly dedicated labor pool per client. ”

Email can be classed as BPaaS, although we’ve moved on now to more advanced tools that can handle any business process, whether that’s in sales, marketing, finance, HR and the list goes on.

BPaaS ultimately can provide more productivity, reduced costs, simplified processes, and higher-quality output. Here are some characteristics:

  • Standardised for use across industries and organisations.  This means it’s flexible and repeatable, meaning higher efficiency and, ultimately, better service and experience for customers.

  • Configurable workflows. Creating workflows for all kinds of business operations with roles and responsibilities, which helps keep people on track, keep projects on time and in-budget, and avoid duplicate work and bottlenecks.

  • Planning tools. Calendars, scheduling, and visibility of where a project is up to, deadlines and milestones.  

  • Collaboration. Assign tasks and responsibilities, version control, communication around projects easily, with in-line commenting and automated notifications.

GatherContent combines both, working in harmony with your CMS

GatherContent is a SaaS Content Operations Platform that fits into both the CaaS and BPaaS categories. It helps organisations plan, create and manage high-stakes content at scale. Improve your content productivity and quality through clear workflow and task assignments, and communicate about content in one centralised place.

With flexible integrations and API, GatherContent sits well with your other tools, and you can create structured content ready to map to your CMS. No more copy and pasting — hurrah! Use it to handle day-to-day content operations as well as things like large website launches, redesigns or other big content projects.

To find out more, book a free demo or product tour.

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About the author

Paige Toomes

Paige is an English Literature and Media graduate from Newcastle University, and over the last three years has built up a career in SEO-driven copywriting for tech companies. She has written for Microsoft, Symantec and LinkedIn, as well as other SaaS companies and IT consulting firms. With an audience-focused approach to content, Paige handles the lifecycle from creation through to measurement, supporting businesses with their content operations.

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