What is the future of web content management?

What is the future of web content management?

5 minute read

What is the future of web content management?

5 minute read

What is the future of web content management?

Afoma Umesi

GatherContent Contributor, Writer
More and more people are creating, managing, and publishing content than ever before. According to Statista, the global content management software application market hit 43.5 billion U.S. dollars in 2020.

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Web content management represents only a fraction of those earnings. But with millions of blogs on the internet, that number is growing, and many content managers are looking for ways to create, edit, publish and update content more efficiently.

However, the big question is:

First, let’s consider some common types of content management systems. Then we’ll consider how they can be useful for you whether you run an e-commerce store or another digital marketing website.

5 Types of Content Management Systems

Any content creator will tell you that there are several types of content. Similarly, there's a variety of content management systems.

Here are some types of content management systems you use in your personal and work life:

Web Content Management System (WCMS)

Web content management systems are designed to help users create, edit, publish and update content on web pages without needing web development skills or markup languages.

Without web content management systems, we’d all need to be proficient HTML users to write and publish website content. (I couldn't do that...could you?) These systems allow us to easily create front-end content while they handle the back-end code.

Popular WCMS providers include Wordpress.com, Joomla, and Drupal.

Digital Asset Management (DAM) System

Unlike WCMS platforms, digital asset management systems enable users to upload, store, organize, and share digital assets. Companies can use these platforms to store digital assets such as logos, videos, audio files, presentations, documents, and even digital content to be sold.

These DAM systems allow for regular updating, backup, and syncing across the organization. Admin users can also set permissions, grant, deny, or revoke access to their assets over time.

Examples of DAM systems are Aprimo and Adobe Experience Manager Assets.

Enterprise Content Management (ECM) System

Enterprise content management refers to the company-wide management solution for the organization and distribution of assets and content.

Technically, DAM is a type of ECM. An organization’s ECM is the way it manages all of its content, from product data and inventory to digital assets and documents.

Popular examples of enterprise content management systems include Microsoft and IBM.

Component Content Management (CCM) System

This form of content management is a more detailed system than basic content management. It manages content at the word, phrase, and paragraph level instead of recording pages and pages of content.

CCM systems use extensible markup language (XML), which is a bit like HTML, to manage content. As a result, it’s easier to re-use the management systems and maintain consistency throughout.

One common CCM system is DITA CCMS by IXIASOFT.

Document Management System (DMS)

Document management systems are typically used to store digital paperwork and other files in the cloud. While digital assets like images and videos can also be stored here, these platforms tend to manage smaller files better and are best suited for digital paperwork.

Most of us use document management systems like Google Drive and Sharepoint every day.

What is the purpose of web content management?

Content management, especially at organizational levels, makes life easier for everyone. But do web content management systems achieve the same feat?

Most do not. Let’s consider what great web content management should entail.

Web content management should ideally provide an efficient system for:

  • Planning web content: A crucial part of content management is planning content. Content management systems should include or allow for the integration of an editorial calendar.
  • Writing or creating content for the web: Using an established style guide, especially for written content allows for consistent website content quality. A good CMS should provide a platform that hosts both the style guide and the content draft for ease.
  • Editing or collaborating on content: Most CMS platforms allow an editor to work on a piece after it’s been completed. However, simultaneous edits are generally impossible. How annoying is it to keep having to pop in and out of a post to allow another user to edit?
  • Publishing content: Scheduling and publishing posts online is usually the final phase of web content management. Most content creators also optimize their posts for SEO at this stage.
  • Updating or refreshing published content: This last step keeps content fresh and maintains optimization for search engines and readers.

Now think, how many web CMS platforms allow for all of the above processes? It’s tough to come up with any names.

CMS platforms aren't for content management

If most CMS platforms barely include 50 percent of the functionality presented in the previous subheading, it’s time to face a harsh truth:

Publishing content is invaluable, no doubt, and without the ability to hit publish, all that work planning and creating content would be in vain. However, it’s unfortunate that there’s very little “management” where the average CMS is concerned.

Content managers typically create a content plan and inventory on another tool like Google Sheets. They write content and edit on Google Docs, organize their images on Google Drive, and finally copy and paste to the CMS where they’ll only schedule or publish.

To make things worse, many CMS platforms also have a bit of a learning curve. This requires that teams train new users to become proficient at managing plug-ins, loading up content, and publishing. Some team members may even need basic HTML knowledge to configure extra functionality.

We can do better than that.

What does the future of web content management look like?

Web content management tools should do what their name entails: manage content creation from start to finish–not just the publishing part.

Thankfully, more content management platforms are stepping up to make content management less of a juggling act. GatherContent is at the top of the list. Here’s how GatherContent simplifies web content management:

  • All-in-one content hub: GatherContent takes you from the planning to the publishing stage without having to switch platforms! Talk about seamless.
  • Real-time collaboration: Assign projects, make edits, and leave comments on projects even as your teammates work on them. You can also set due dates and set up content workflows so everyone knows which role to play throughout the content creation process.
Collaboration on GatherContent web content management system
Collaboration is easy (and enjoyable) on GatherContent
  • CMS integration: Done writing and tweaking? GatherContent is a headless CMS that integrates with popular CMS platforms like WordPress and Drupal using API, allowing you to ship your content for publishing. It also supports automation using integrations with tools like Zapier.
  • User-friendly design: If you’re used to Google Docs like most content managers are, GatherContent’s user interface will feel especially intuitive.
gathercontent interface web content management system
GatherContent's user interface is similar to Google Docs –no new training necessary!
  • Built-in style guides: Include your style guide and even add checklists for writers to follow as they create content.
  • Article templates: Set up article templates using drag-and-drop functionality, so no one has to bother formatting their article every time they need to write.
gathercontent article template web content management
Create as many content templates as you need

Using the right WCM systems can revolutionize the way you create and manage content, making you faster and more productive. Get a more in-depth comparison of GatherContent and your favorite WCM system to help you decide.

Good to Know: Ready for a content management system that actually manages your content? (Your team will thank you.) Start your GatherContent free trial today.

Web content management represents only a fraction of those earnings. But with millions of blogs on the internet, that number is growing, and many content managers are looking for ways to create, edit, publish and update content more efficiently.

However, the big question is:

First, let’s consider some common types of content management systems. Then we’ll consider how they can be useful for you whether you run an e-commerce store or another digital marketing website.

5 Types of Content Management Systems

Any content creator will tell you that there are several types of content. Similarly, there's a variety of content management systems.

Here are some types of content management systems you use in your personal and work life:

Web Content Management System (WCMS)

Web content management systems are designed to help users create, edit, publish and update content on web pages without needing web development skills or markup languages.

Without web content management systems, we’d all need to be proficient HTML users to write and publish website content. (I couldn't do that...could you?) These systems allow us to easily create front-end content while they handle the back-end code.

Popular WCMS providers include Wordpress.com, Joomla, and Drupal.

Digital Asset Management (DAM) System

Unlike WCMS platforms, digital asset management systems enable users to upload, store, organize, and share digital assets. Companies can use these platforms to store digital assets such as logos, videos, audio files, presentations, documents, and even digital content to be sold.

These DAM systems allow for regular updating, backup, and syncing across the organization. Admin users can also set permissions, grant, deny, or revoke access to their assets over time.

Examples of DAM systems are Aprimo and Adobe Experience Manager Assets.

Enterprise Content Management (ECM) System

Enterprise content management refers to the company-wide management solution for the organization and distribution of assets and content.

Technically, DAM is a type of ECM. An organization’s ECM is the way it manages all of its content, from product data and inventory to digital assets and documents.

Popular examples of enterprise content management systems include Microsoft and IBM.

Component Content Management (CCM) System

This form of content management is a more detailed system than basic content management. It manages content at the word, phrase, and paragraph level instead of recording pages and pages of content.

CCM systems use extensible markup language (XML), which is a bit like HTML, to manage content. As a result, it’s easier to re-use the management systems and maintain consistency throughout.

One common CCM system is DITA CCMS by IXIASOFT.

Document Management System (DMS)

Document management systems are typically used to store digital paperwork and other files in the cloud. While digital assets like images and videos can also be stored here, these platforms tend to manage smaller files better and are best suited for digital paperwork.

Most of us use document management systems like Google Drive and Sharepoint every day.

What is the purpose of web content management?

Content management, especially at organizational levels, makes life easier for everyone. But do web content management systems achieve the same feat?

Most do not. Let’s consider what great web content management should entail.

Web content management should ideally provide an efficient system for:

  • Planning web content: A crucial part of content management is planning content. Content management systems should include or allow for the integration of an editorial calendar.
  • Writing or creating content for the web: Using an established style guide, especially for written content allows for consistent website content quality. A good CMS should provide a platform that hosts both the style guide and the content draft for ease.
  • Editing or collaborating on content: Most CMS platforms allow an editor to work on a piece after it’s been completed. However, simultaneous edits are generally impossible. How annoying is it to keep having to pop in and out of a post to allow another user to edit?
  • Publishing content: Scheduling and publishing posts online is usually the final phase of web content management. Most content creators also optimize their posts for SEO at this stage.
  • Updating or refreshing published content: This last step keeps content fresh and maintains optimization for search engines and readers.

Now think, how many web CMS platforms allow for all of the above processes? It’s tough to come up with any names.

CMS platforms aren't for content management

If most CMS platforms barely include 50 percent of the functionality presented in the previous subheading, it’s time to face a harsh truth:

Publishing content is invaluable, no doubt, and without the ability to hit publish, all that work planning and creating content would be in vain. However, it’s unfortunate that there’s very little “management” where the average CMS is concerned.

Content managers typically create a content plan and inventory on another tool like Google Sheets. They write content and edit on Google Docs, organize their images on Google Drive, and finally copy and paste to the CMS where they’ll only schedule or publish.

To make things worse, many CMS platforms also have a bit of a learning curve. This requires that teams train new users to become proficient at managing plug-ins, loading up content, and publishing. Some team members may even need basic HTML knowledge to configure extra functionality.

We can do better than that.

What does the future of web content management look like?

Web content management tools should do what their name entails: manage content creation from start to finish–not just the publishing part.

Thankfully, more content management platforms are stepping up to make content management less of a juggling act. GatherContent is at the top of the list. Here’s how GatherContent simplifies web content management:

  • All-in-one content hub: GatherContent takes you from the planning to the publishing stage without having to switch platforms! Talk about seamless.
  • Real-time collaboration: Assign projects, make edits, and leave comments on projects even as your teammates work on them. You can also set due dates and set up content workflows so everyone knows which role to play throughout the content creation process.
Collaboration on GatherContent web content management system
Collaboration is easy (and enjoyable) on GatherContent
  • CMS integration: Done writing and tweaking? GatherContent is a headless CMS that integrates with popular CMS platforms like WordPress and Drupal using API, allowing you to ship your content for publishing. It also supports automation using integrations with tools like Zapier.
  • User-friendly design: If you’re used to Google Docs like most content managers are, GatherContent’s user interface will feel especially intuitive.
gathercontent interface web content management system
GatherContent's user interface is similar to Google Docs –no new training necessary!
  • Built-in style guides: Include your style guide and even add checklists for writers to follow as they create content.
  • Article templates: Set up article templates using drag-and-drop functionality, so no one has to bother formatting their article every time they need to write.
gathercontent article template web content management
Create as many content templates as you need

Using the right WCM systems can revolutionize the way you create and manage content, making you faster and more productive. Get a more in-depth comparison of GatherContent and your favorite WCM system to help you decide.

Good to Know: Ready for a content management system that actually manages your content? (Your team will thank you.) Start your GatherContent free trial today.

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