Conversion copywriting: 4 tips for writing copy that connects and converts

Conversion copywriting: 4 tips for writing copy that connects and converts

6 minute read

Conversion copywriting: 4 tips for writing copy that connects and converts

6 minute read

Conversion copywriting: 4 tips for writing copy that connects and converts

Benjamin Edward Fitton

Copywriter
Ah, copywriting. The art of selling products or raising awareness by putting the right words in the right order. Historically, copywriters have been tasked with writing adverts for TV, magazines, and outbound media, but in the digital age, these tasks have come to incorporate website copy, social media, blog posts, Google ads, and a whole slew of digital content.

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Conversion copywriting is the common thread between all of these different types of content marketing. This type of copywriting is essential to writing effective copy for any channel. We’re going to dive a little deeper into what conversion copywriting is and offer our top tips for how you can use it to connect and convert your target audience.

What is conversion copywriting?

Conversion copywriting is a type of persuasive writing that aims to get a person to take a specific action, often to buy a product or service. Conversion copy narrows the focus of writing to a single goal—to convert, which means getting the reader to do something right then and there.

Conversion doesn't necessarily mean purchase. In fact, conversion can mean any number of things like:

  • Clicking a call-to-action button
  • Making a phone call
  • Filling out an online form
  • Adding something to an online shopping cart
  • Subscribing to a list or newsletter
  • Sharing an offer on social media
  • Going to another page of your website

In trying to persuade the reader to convert, the copywriter's goal is to write simple, clear, and persuasive content that educates the reader as to a product's, service’s or brand’s proposition and then, most importantly, explains the benefit it brings to their lives.

To show what we mean, take a look at the SEO software giant, Moz's homepage:

Example of a call to action on the Moz website which says Try Moz Pro free.
Moz offers a clear value proposition in very plain and simple language. (Source)

Moz opens up with a simple statement that not only states what they want the reader to do next but also clearly states their value proposition. They offer a smarter way to "do SEO."

The sub-copy then concisely explains the benefits they bring to your business. They provide you with the software to "increase traffic, rankings, and visibility" on the search engine results page.

An eye-grabbing call to action comes next, in a bold colour but one that doesn’t upset the conversion-centered design. The call to action copy is simple, leads with a verb (“Try”), and throws that all-important word in there—“free”.

A final message invites people to get a complimentary walkthrough with an SEO specialist. This is an added bonus that serves as a last final push for those who are thinking about starting a free trial.

All in all, this conversion copy promises better SEO, offers a list of the product's benefits, includes an alluring call to action, and adds an irresistible bonus.

Not bad for 35 words, right?

Note that they don't talk about their years of experience, why they're “smarter” or how they do what they do. Because this part of the site is all about converting, not explaining. That comes elsewhere, once the user is sufficiently intrigued and wants to learn more.

As this example shows, conversion copywriting differs from other forms because it’s so singular in its purpose. It doesn’t try to entertain or be cute and clever like print ads, social media, or blog content might. It’s there to explain what a brand has to sell and how it can benefit whoever decides to buy it.

But most importantly, it's there to inspire readers to take a very specific action. In this case, to start a free trial.

Four tips for getting started with conversion copywriting

So, how do you go about creating effective, high-quality conversion-focused copywriting?

While there are many techniques for writing conversion-focused copy, and getting it right takes some practice, there are a few things every conversion copywriter must do if they want their web copy to inspire others to take action.

Here are four tips to get you started on writing conversion-focused copy:

1. Do your research

Like all copywriting, you've got to research before you write. In fact, research should be the biggest part of a conversion copywriter's job. The copywriter needs to know the audience's pain points, how the product, service, or brand solves those pain points, and what is most likely to get the audience to take action.

During this discovery phase, you’ll want to uncover:

  • The features of your product
  • Your product's USP
  • The needs of the customer
  • Who the typical customer is (the marketing persona)
  • What benefits your product provides
  • Why it's better than the competition
  • What customers have said about it
  • Any statistics relating to its transformative performance
  • The hierarchy of messaging (the right order in which to present your messages to the reader)

During this phase, you’ll speak to or gather information from various internal teams (like engineering, sales, or marketing) and potential, existing, and former customers. You'll also need to do some independent industry and/or competitor research before you start writing copy.

From this trove of information, you can understand what the customer needs, how the product can meet those needs, and the order in which the messaging has to appear to offer the best chance of a conversion. You can also use customer testimonials, product reviews, and supporting statistics as proof of how good the product is.

Methods of Market Research
Carrying out research such as; focus groups, one-to-one interviews and ethnographic research will help you to figure out your audience's pain points. (Source)

A rigorous discovery phase is about arming yourself with all you need to convince a reader to take action. Without it, you’re just guessing. And if there's one thing that makes for poor conversion rates, it's guesswork.

2. Start at the finish

With the research done, now’s the time to put the kettle on, roll up your sleeves and get writing. You’ve got all the information you need. You now need to articulate it in the right way and put the messages in the right order to inspire conversion.

"One page, one message," so goes the conversion copywriter's mantra. And with good reason.

Maximising conversion rates means having zero distractions that might take people away from your "one message." That means you need to focus on one conversion goal. For example, if you are writing a sales page, you need to make sure that it is only selling one offer and it only has one goal—to sell the product or service.

Before writing, ask yourself: What do I want this copy to achieve? What do I want the reader to do?

Is it to get new email subscribers? To encourage opt-in downloads? Are you convincing people to sign up for an event or free consultation? Or is it purely sales-driven?

Whatever your conversion goal is, get it crystal clear in your mind before you start writing. Only then can you write focused copy that resonates with the reader in order to optimize your conversion rates.

3. Understand the buyer's journey

In the research phase, you’ll dive deep into the needs of your prospective customers. You’ll have worked out the problems they face and how this product, service, or brand can help the potential buyer overcome them.

However, your customers have different needs at different times, and your copywriting needs to reflect that.

Whether buying a car or a colander, people go through the same buying process, the buyer’s journey:

  • Awareness: The prospect knows they have a problem and are researching possible solutions. At this point in the buyer's journey, the person may not know how to explain or articulate their problem clearly.
  • Consideration: The prospect now knows the different ways they can solve their problem and are comparing potential solutions. At this point, the prospect understands the different solutions, but they need to consider and compare their options.
  • Decision: In this part of the buyer's journey, the prospect is making their final choice. At this point, they are ready to buy and know which solution they want to go with. They just need to decide the exact brand they will be buying from.
Buyers Journey
Examples of the customer's needs at each stage of the buyer's journey. (Source)

Awareness stage

In the awareness stage, conversion copywriting has to help potential buyers diagnose their problems. They are aware they are experiencing some type of issue, but they may not know what exactly the problem is or how to describe it.

At this stage, marketers can provide their audience with educational content like videos, e-books, blog posts, and white papers that dive deeper into the specific problem. The conversion goal for these types of digital marketing content might be to take them to another page or piece of content that explains the problem further or gets them to that consideration phase.

Consideration stage

In the consideration stage, copywriting has to show the features and benefits your product brings to the table. This is where you might have video, podcast, or webcast content that dives deeper into the solutions available for this particular problem.

At this point, you will still be educating your audience quite a bit. The conversion goal for this type of content is to get the audience to that decision phase where you can showcase your particular solution.

Decision stage

At the decision stage, you’ve got to prove you’re the company worth choosing. This is when it's time to show testimonials, statistics, product reviews, and other forms of ‘social proof’ that convince readers of your ability and trustworthiness. Depending on your type of offer, you may also encourage your audience to get a live demo or sign up for a free trial so they can see the benefits for themselves.

Content throughout the stages of the buyer's journey

Let’s look at an example of what digital marketing content might look like throughout the buyer's journey. In this example, we looking at a waterproof jacket.

In the awareness stage, your buyer will have a trigger—perhaps an upcoming hiking holiday— that prompts them to say “Hey, I need a waterproof jacket!”

But what kind of fabric should it have? How sturdy should it be? Which jackets offer the best protection from those harsh mountain winds? How much do I need to spend?

This is where a blog, social post, or video will come into play, taking your buyer through these questions and educating them as to what they need. The point of this content is to get the prospect to the next step of the buyer’s journey by understanding their problems, answering their questions, and prompting them to find out more about your brand via a purposeful call to action.

In the consideration stage, your copywriting must focus on showing the features of your products (the Gore-Tex fiber, the breathable lining, the helmet-compatible hood) and their benefits (stay dry even in torrential weather, stay warm without sweating, wear over your cycling helmet so you stay dry and safe.)

Consideration content might include comparison articles (“Brand X vs Brand Y - which is best?”), case studies, and in-depth reviews. The purpose of this content is to showcase the value of your specific product. It also helps add that element of social proof, which can be vital in influencing conversions.

And in the decision phase, your copywriting must convince readers that you’re the brand for them via product reviews, testimonials, demonstrations, discount offers, and so on. These types of content support conversion rate optimization (CRO) because they provide proof of your solution at work, which makes potential buyers more likely to consider your product.

Content through the buyer's journey
Examples of tasks under each stage of the buyer's and content's journey. (Source)

Remember that at each phase you need to ‘start from the finish’. Work out what you want your copywriting to achieve or what action do you want your reader to take, and write words that inspire them to do it.

4. Nail your calls to action

The call to action is the part of your copy that tells the reader what you want them to do next. It's one of the most important parts of your content and an essential element of conversion copywriting because the call to action is what helps turn prospects into customers.

Before writing your call to action, revisit that all-important question of, "what do I want my reader to do?"

Remember, this won't always be to buy something. If they are not in the stage of the buyer's journey where they are ready to buy, then you'll want to inspire them to do something else that aligns with where they are. That could be to get on your email list, download your "Top 10 LinkedIn Strategies" ebook, or sign up for a free trial of your software.

You need to know what you want the prospect to do before explaining where they should go or how they should do it. The best call-to-actions keep things short, lead with emotive verbs, and finish the reader’s question that starts: I want to…

  • Get updates on the latest trends
  • Enjoy a 2-month free trial
  • Uncover the secret to LinkedIn

By the way, CTAs aren’t just about the copy. They’ve got to be bold and eye-catching (without compromising the overall design). And they’ve got to be placed at key points in the communications.

You should always include a CTA at the top of your web page like Trello does here:

An example from Trello of a call to action for conversion which sats 'Sign Up - It's Free!'
Trello uses a CTA at the top of their homepage to try and get users to start up now for free. (Source)

But what if the reader doesn’t take you up on your initial CTA? Then you need to season the rest of your page with other options, like this:

A screenshot from Trello showing 'Trello your way.'
Trello uses another CTA on their homepage to try and get users to sign up again after they either missed or ignored the first CTA. (Source)


Notice that the calls to action refer to specific actions that Trello wants its users to take. These actions reinforce other aspects of the platform not covered in the web page’s opening section.

Trello then finishes their home page with the same CTA they started with:

An example from Trello of their homepage call to action that says 'Get Started - It's Free!'
Trello uses a "Get started-It's Free!" CTA at the bottom of their home page.  (Source)

Note that this affirmative call to action (Sign up-it's free!) is also supported by the reasons why they would want to try it out ("reach new productivity peaks," and "accomplish it all.")

Killer conversion copywriting examples

The best way to learn how to create highly effective conversion copy is to look at great copy that converts and apply the marketing strategies it uses to your own content. Here are just a few examples of killer conversion copywriting that will inspire you to write your own:


Blog Post

Blog posts are typically used in the awareness and consideration phases of the buyer's journey to educate your audience and get them to take the next step. HubSpot does an excellent job of creating high-quality blog content that addresses its readers' questions, pain points, and needs while providing a clear and logical next step for the reader to take.

Here's an example of a CTA at the end of a HubSpot blog post on online advertising:

HubSpot blog CTA example
HubSpot strategically places a CTA at the end of their online advertising blog post to get their reader to download the Advertising Plan Kit. (Source)

After reading a blog post all about online advertising in 2021, there's a good chance that the reader will want to get started with online advertising for themselves. HubSpot offers a great next step by inviting the person to download an advertising plan kit that provides a ton of templates and guides to online ads.

HubSpot is providing additional education and value to the reader, making them more likely to be interested in future HubSpot content. For HubSpot, this gated content allows them to get the reader's email address so they can continue to keep in touch as a way to stay top of mind and promote to them in the future.

Ad

Ads typically have the goal of converting prospects into paying customers. This example of a Facebook ad from Target is simple and to the point, but it gets the job done:

Target ad example
Target uses a simple and direct facebook ad which catches the audiences eye straight away with a large image and bold red font. (Source)

The image is eye-catching and shows happy people wearing sweaters. (What better way to advertise a sweater sale?) The big bold red text says "buy one, get one 50% off," drawing the reader's eye to the enticing sale content.

The actual text of the ad is simple, yet effective. "One week only" adds some urgency for prospects to act on the sale if they are interested. The CTA button simply says "shop now," letting readers know exactly what they will find when they click that button—sweaters to shop from.

Email

Here's another simple example of conversion copywriting from Under Armour. There is very little content in the actual email. However, it's clear what action they want you to take, and they provide an irresistible offer.

Under Armour email example
Under Amrnour take a minimalistic approach to their email, very little content but with a very clear easy to see action. (Source)

In this example, you really get a feel for the Under Armour brand. The "Welcome to the Team" image makes the reader feel like a part of something. And the mission reinforces why someone would want to shop with Under Armour—"Under Armour makes you better. We build the gear, you supply the will." Overall, this appeals to UA's target buyer—someone who enjoys exercise or sports and makes it a regular part of their life.

The conversion goal here is to get the reader to make a purchase. They offer an incentive (free shipping with no minimum), tell the reader how to get the incentive ("use the promo code"), and give clear next steps. The reader can either "Shop new arrivals" or "Shop best sellers."

While this example does offer two CTAs, which is not common for conversion-focused content, the simplicity of the content ensures that the two options don't feel overwhelming. Instead of sending people to the general website where they will have hundreds of options for what to click on, they are narrowing down the choices to the most popular - new arrivals and best sellers.

Product description

While you may not think of product descriptions as conversion copy, that is, ultimately, their main purpose—to convert browsers into buyers. This product description from Harber London has all of the elements of great conversion copy.

Harber London product description example
Harber London uses an engaging product description as well as an eye-catching "pre-order" CTA. (Source)

By the time someone gets to this product page, they are most likely interested in making a purchase. The product description offers details on the bag's features, written in a way that makes it most appealing. Instead of saying the bag has belt straps, the description features "removable, functional belt straps." The additional adjectives help show the benefits of this particular feature (and why it may be better than a similar item from a competitor).

The images of the bag clearly show what it looks like from all angles. While the CTA tells the viewer to "pre-order" this bag with a nice eye-catching green button.

Are you a convert?‍

Next time you’re writing a home page, a landing page, an ad, or anything that needs to persuade someone to take action right then and there, consider the following principles of conversion copywriting:

  • Do your research. Find out what you’re selling, why someone should buy it, and who the target audience is.
  • Start at the finish. Identify what you want your readers to do and work backward from there.
  • Take your reader through the buyer’s journey. Your copywriting has to lead your prospect by the hand from awareness to the final sale.
  • Use positive calls to action. Start the call to action with a verb (‘Try’, ‘Join’, ‘Grow’, ‘Smash’) and finish the reader’s question that starts with ‘I want to…’‍

All that’s left for you to do is get out there and get converting.

Ready to get started using GatherContent? Start a free trial today!


Conversion copywriting is the common thread between all of these different types of content marketing. This type of copywriting is essential to writing effective copy for any channel. We’re going to dive a little deeper into what conversion copywriting is and offer our top tips for how you can use it to connect and convert your target audience.

What is conversion copywriting?

Conversion copywriting is a type of persuasive writing that aims to get a person to take a specific action, often to buy a product or service. Conversion copy narrows the focus of writing to a single goal—to convert, which means getting the reader to do something right then and there.

Conversion doesn't necessarily mean purchase. In fact, conversion can mean any number of things like:

  • Clicking a call-to-action button
  • Making a phone call
  • Filling out an online form
  • Adding something to an online shopping cart
  • Subscribing to a list or newsletter
  • Sharing an offer on social media
  • Going to another page of your website

In trying to persuade the reader to convert, the copywriter's goal is to write simple, clear, and persuasive content that educates the reader as to a product's, service’s or brand’s proposition and then, most importantly, explains the benefit it brings to their lives.

To show what we mean, take a look at the SEO software giant, Moz's homepage:

Example of a call to action on the Moz website which says Try Moz Pro free.
Moz offers a clear value proposition in very plain and simple language. (Source)

Moz opens up with a simple statement that not only states what they want the reader to do next but also clearly states their value proposition. They offer a smarter way to "do SEO."

The sub-copy then concisely explains the benefits they bring to your business. They provide you with the software to "increase traffic, rankings, and visibility" on the search engine results page.

An eye-grabbing call to action comes next, in a bold colour but one that doesn’t upset the conversion-centered design. The call to action copy is simple, leads with a verb (“Try”), and throws that all-important word in there—“free”.

A final message invites people to get a complimentary walkthrough with an SEO specialist. This is an added bonus that serves as a last final push for those who are thinking about starting a free trial.

All in all, this conversion copy promises better SEO, offers a list of the product's benefits, includes an alluring call to action, and adds an irresistible bonus.

Not bad for 35 words, right?

Note that they don't talk about their years of experience, why they're “smarter” or how they do what they do. Because this part of the site is all about converting, not explaining. That comes elsewhere, once the user is sufficiently intrigued and wants to learn more.

As this example shows, conversion copywriting differs from other forms because it’s so singular in its purpose. It doesn’t try to entertain or be cute and clever like print ads, social media, or blog content might. It’s there to explain what a brand has to sell and how it can benefit whoever decides to buy it.

But most importantly, it's there to inspire readers to take a very specific action. In this case, to start a free trial.

Four tips for getting started with conversion copywriting

So, how do you go about creating effective, high-quality conversion-focused copywriting?

While there are many techniques for writing conversion-focused copy, and getting it right takes some practice, there are a few things every conversion copywriter must do if they want their web copy to inspire others to take action.

Here are four tips to get you started on writing conversion-focused copy:

1. Do your research

Like all copywriting, you've got to research before you write. In fact, research should be the biggest part of a conversion copywriter's job. The copywriter needs to know the audience's pain points, how the product, service, or brand solves those pain points, and what is most likely to get the audience to take action.

During this discovery phase, you’ll want to uncover:

  • The features of your product
  • Your product's USP
  • The needs of the customer
  • Who the typical customer is (the marketing persona)
  • What benefits your product provides
  • Why it's better than the competition
  • What customers have said about it
  • Any statistics relating to its transformative performance
  • The hierarchy of messaging (the right order in which to present your messages to the reader)

During this phase, you’ll speak to or gather information from various internal teams (like engineering, sales, or marketing) and potential, existing, and former customers. You'll also need to do some independent industry and/or competitor research before you start writing copy.

From this trove of information, you can understand what the customer needs, how the product can meet those needs, and the order in which the messaging has to appear to offer the best chance of a conversion. You can also use customer testimonials, product reviews, and supporting statistics as proof of how good the product is.

Methods of Market Research
Carrying out research such as; focus groups, one-to-one interviews and ethnographic research will help you to figure out your audience's pain points. (Source)

A rigorous discovery phase is about arming yourself with all you need to convince a reader to take action. Without it, you’re just guessing. And if there's one thing that makes for poor conversion rates, it's guesswork.

2. Start at the finish

With the research done, now’s the time to put the kettle on, roll up your sleeves and get writing. You’ve got all the information you need. You now need to articulate it in the right way and put the messages in the right order to inspire conversion.

"One page, one message," so goes the conversion copywriter's mantra. And with good reason.

Maximising conversion rates means having zero distractions that might take people away from your "one message." That means you need to focus on one conversion goal. For example, if you are writing a sales page, you need to make sure that it is only selling one offer and it only has one goal—to sell the product or service.

Before writing, ask yourself: What do I want this copy to achieve? What do I want the reader to do?

Is it to get new email subscribers? To encourage opt-in downloads? Are you convincing people to sign up for an event or free consultation? Or is it purely sales-driven?

Whatever your conversion goal is, get it crystal clear in your mind before you start writing. Only then can you write focused copy that resonates with the reader in order to optimize your conversion rates.

3. Understand the buyer's journey

In the research phase, you’ll dive deep into the needs of your prospective customers. You’ll have worked out the problems they face and how this product, service, or brand can help the potential buyer overcome them.

However, your customers have different needs at different times, and your copywriting needs to reflect that.

Whether buying a car or a colander, people go through the same buying process, the buyer’s journey:

  • Awareness: The prospect knows they have a problem and are researching possible solutions. At this point in the buyer's journey, the person may not know how to explain or articulate their problem clearly.
  • Consideration: The prospect now knows the different ways they can solve their problem and are comparing potential solutions. At this point, the prospect understands the different solutions, but they need to consider and compare their options.
  • Decision: In this part of the buyer's journey, the prospect is making their final choice. At this point, they are ready to buy and know which solution they want to go with. They just need to decide the exact brand they will be buying from.
Buyers Journey
Examples of the customer's needs at each stage of the buyer's journey. (Source)

Awareness stage

In the awareness stage, conversion copywriting has to help potential buyers diagnose their problems. They are aware they are experiencing some type of issue, but they may not know what exactly the problem is or how to describe it.

At this stage, marketers can provide their audience with educational content like videos, e-books, blog posts, and white papers that dive deeper into the specific problem. The conversion goal for these types of digital marketing content might be to take them to another page or piece of content that explains the problem further or gets them to that consideration phase.

Consideration stage

In the consideration stage, copywriting has to show the features and benefits your product brings to the table. This is where you might have video, podcast, or webcast content that dives deeper into the solutions available for this particular problem.

At this point, you will still be educating your audience quite a bit. The conversion goal for this type of content is to get the audience to that decision phase where you can showcase your particular solution.

Decision stage

At the decision stage, you’ve got to prove you’re the company worth choosing. This is when it's time to show testimonials, statistics, product reviews, and other forms of ‘social proof’ that convince readers of your ability and trustworthiness. Depending on your type of offer, you may also encourage your audience to get a live demo or sign up for a free trial so they can see the benefits for themselves.

Content throughout the stages of the buyer's journey

Let’s look at an example of what digital marketing content might look like throughout the buyer's journey. In this example, we looking at a waterproof jacket.

In the awareness stage, your buyer will have a trigger—perhaps an upcoming hiking holiday— that prompts them to say “Hey, I need a waterproof jacket!”

But what kind of fabric should it have? How sturdy should it be? Which jackets offer the best protection from those harsh mountain winds? How much do I need to spend?

This is where a blog, social post, or video will come into play, taking your buyer through these questions and educating them as to what they need. The point of this content is to get the prospect to the next step of the buyer’s journey by understanding their problems, answering their questions, and prompting them to find out more about your brand via a purposeful call to action.

In the consideration stage, your copywriting must focus on showing the features of your products (the Gore-Tex fiber, the breathable lining, the helmet-compatible hood) and their benefits (stay dry even in torrential weather, stay warm without sweating, wear over your cycling helmet so you stay dry and safe.)

Consideration content might include comparison articles (“Brand X vs Brand Y - which is best?”), case studies, and in-depth reviews. The purpose of this content is to showcase the value of your specific product. It also helps add that element of social proof, which can be vital in influencing conversions.

And in the decision phase, your copywriting must convince readers that you’re the brand for them via product reviews, testimonials, demonstrations, discount offers, and so on. These types of content support conversion rate optimization (CRO) because they provide proof of your solution at work, which makes potential buyers more likely to consider your product.

Content through the buyer's journey
Examples of tasks under each stage of the buyer's and content's journey. (Source)

Remember that at each phase you need to ‘start from the finish’. Work out what you want your copywriting to achieve or what action do you want your reader to take, and write words that inspire them to do it.

4. Nail your calls to action

The call to action is the part of your copy that tells the reader what you want them to do next. It's one of the most important parts of your content and an essential element of conversion copywriting because the call to action is what helps turn prospects into customers.

Before writing your call to action, revisit that all-important question of, "what do I want my reader to do?"

Remember, this won't always be to buy something. If they are not in the stage of the buyer's journey where they are ready to buy, then you'll want to inspire them to do something else that aligns with where they are. That could be to get on your email list, download your "Top 10 LinkedIn Strategies" ebook, or sign up for a free trial of your software.

You need to know what you want the prospect to do before explaining where they should go or how they should do it. The best call-to-actions keep things short, lead with emotive verbs, and finish the reader’s question that starts: I want to…

  • Get updates on the latest trends
  • Enjoy a 2-month free trial
  • Uncover the secret to LinkedIn

By the way, CTAs aren’t just about the copy. They’ve got to be bold and eye-catching (without compromising the overall design). And they’ve got to be placed at key points in the communications.

You should always include a CTA at the top of your web page like Trello does here:

An example from Trello of a call to action for conversion which sats 'Sign Up - It's Free!'
Trello uses a CTA at the top of their homepage to try and get users to start up now for free. (Source)

But what if the reader doesn’t take you up on your initial CTA? Then you need to season the rest of your page with other options, like this:

A screenshot from Trello showing 'Trello your way.'
Trello uses another CTA on their homepage to try and get users to sign up again after they either missed or ignored the first CTA. (Source)


Notice that the calls to action refer to specific actions that Trello wants its users to take. These actions reinforce other aspects of the platform not covered in the web page’s opening section.

Trello then finishes their home page with the same CTA they started with:

An example from Trello of their homepage call to action that says 'Get Started - It's Free!'
Trello uses a "Get started-It's Free!" CTA at the bottom of their home page.  (Source)

Note that this affirmative call to action (Sign up-it's free!) is also supported by the reasons why they would want to try it out ("reach new productivity peaks," and "accomplish it all.")

Killer conversion copywriting examples

The best way to learn how to create highly effective conversion copy is to look at great copy that converts and apply the marketing strategies it uses to your own content. Here are just a few examples of killer conversion copywriting that will inspire you to write your own:


Blog Post

Blog posts are typically used in the awareness and consideration phases of the buyer's journey to educate your audience and get them to take the next step. HubSpot does an excellent job of creating high-quality blog content that addresses its readers' questions, pain points, and needs while providing a clear and logical next step for the reader to take.

Here's an example of a CTA at the end of a HubSpot blog post on online advertising:

HubSpot blog CTA example
HubSpot strategically places a CTA at the end of their online advertising blog post to get their reader to download the Advertising Plan Kit. (Source)

After reading a blog post all about online advertising in 2021, there's a good chance that the reader will want to get started with online advertising for themselves. HubSpot offers a great next step by inviting the person to download an advertising plan kit that provides a ton of templates and guides to online ads.

HubSpot is providing additional education and value to the reader, making them more likely to be interested in future HubSpot content. For HubSpot, this gated content allows them to get the reader's email address so they can continue to keep in touch as a way to stay top of mind and promote to them in the future.

Ad

Ads typically have the goal of converting prospects into paying customers. This example of a Facebook ad from Target is simple and to the point, but it gets the job done:

Target ad example
Target uses a simple and direct facebook ad which catches the audiences eye straight away with a large image and bold red font. (Source)

The image is eye-catching and shows happy people wearing sweaters. (What better way to advertise a sweater sale?) The big bold red text says "buy one, get one 50% off," drawing the reader's eye to the enticing sale content.

The actual text of the ad is simple, yet effective. "One week only" adds some urgency for prospects to act on the sale if they are interested. The CTA button simply says "shop now," letting readers know exactly what they will find when they click that button—sweaters to shop from.

Email

Here's another simple example of conversion copywriting from Under Armour. There is very little content in the actual email. However, it's clear what action they want you to take, and they provide an irresistible offer.

Under Armour email example
Under Amrnour take a minimalistic approach to their email, very little content but with a very clear easy to see action. (Source)

In this example, you really get a feel for the Under Armour brand. The "Welcome to the Team" image makes the reader feel like a part of something. And the mission reinforces why someone would want to shop with Under Armour—"Under Armour makes you better. We build the gear, you supply the will." Overall, this appeals to UA's target buyer—someone who enjoys exercise or sports and makes it a regular part of their life.

The conversion goal here is to get the reader to make a purchase. They offer an incentive (free shipping with no minimum), tell the reader how to get the incentive ("use the promo code"), and give clear next steps. The reader can either "Shop new arrivals" or "Shop best sellers."

While this example does offer two CTAs, which is not common for conversion-focused content, the simplicity of the content ensures that the two options don't feel overwhelming. Instead of sending people to the general website where they will have hundreds of options for what to click on, they are narrowing down the choices to the most popular - new arrivals and best sellers.

Product description

While you may not think of product descriptions as conversion copy, that is, ultimately, their main purpose—to convert browsers into buyers. This product description from Harber London has all of the elements of great conversion copy.

Harber London product description example
Harber London uses an engaging product description as well as an eye-catching "pre-order" CTA. (Source)

By the time someone gets to this product page, they are most likely interested in making a purchase. The product description offers details on the bag's features, written in a way that makes it most appealing. Instead of saying the bag has belt straps, the description features "removable, functional belt straps." The additional adjectives help show the benefits of this particular feature (and why it may be better than a similar item from a competitor).

The images of the bag clearly show what it looks like from all angles. While the CTA tells the viewer to "pre-order" this bag with a nice eye-catching green button.

Are you a convert?‍

Next time you’re writing a home page, a landing page, an ad, or anything that needs to persuade someone to take action right then and there, consider the following principles of conversion copywriting:

  • Do your research. Find out what you’re selling, why someone should buy it, and who the target audience is.
  • Start at the finish. Identify what you want your readers to do and work backward from there.
  • Take your reader through the buyer’s journey. Your copywriting has to lead your prospect by the hand from awareness to the final sale.
  • Use positive calls to action. Start the call to action with a verb (‘Try’, ‘Join’, ‘Grow’, ‘Smash’) and finish the reader’s question that starts with ‘I want to…’‍

All that’s left for you to do is get out there and get converting.

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About the author

Benjamin Edward Fitton

Benjamin Edward Fitton is a copywriter who puts words in the right order for money and who uses his middle name in biographies to sound more important than he is. He works for some of the world’s biggest brands but is just as proud of the work he does for some of the world’s smallest. This blog was a guest submission by Turncoat Marketing.

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